The Associated Press Takes a Stand Against AI-Generated News, Urging Journalists to Verify Sources, US

Date:

The Associated Press (AP), one of the largest news wire services in the United States, is taking a stand against the use of AI-generated news articles. In a blog post, the AP’s VP of standards, Amanda Barrett, emphasized that while AI can be a valuable tool to improve journalistic work, it should not replace human journalists. The AP has implemented guidelines that allow staff to experiment with AI chatbots like ChatGPT, but they are not permitted to generate publishable content. Instead, any output from the AI must be treated as unvetted source material, requiring journalists to independently verify the information and find actual sources.

These new guidelines reflect the AP’s commitment to maintaining the veracity of its news reporting. Journalists are now expected to be extra cautious about the sources they use, conducting reverse image searches and seeking corroboration from multiple trusted sources. The AP’s decision to prioritize source verification comes after an open letter signed by major media organizations, including the AP, urging lawmakers to require AI developers to obtain consent before training their models on media content.

While the AP itself employs AI for certain tasks, such as generating articles on niche data-driven topics or summarizing stories for subhead blurbs, it has made it clear that it will not use AI to modify photos, videos, or audio. However, the AP has entered into a two-year agreement with OpenAI, the creator of ChatGPT, allowing OpenAI to train its language models on the AP’s extensive archive of content. In return, OpenAI has made philanthropic donations to journalism nonprofits.

See also  China's Groundbreaking Method to Control ChatGPT and Artificial Intelligence

The AP’s approach differs from that of other major newsrooms. For example, The New York Times recently updated its Terms of Service to prohibit the use of its articles for training AI models. Nevertheless, companies like Google continue to pursue partnerships with newsrooms to promote the use of AI tools. Some media outlets, such as CNET, have even experimented with fully AI-generated articles, though these attempts have been criticized for their inaccuracies.

The AP’s influence extends far beyond the United States, with its content being republished by over 1,000 smaller news outlets and hosting numerous bureaus worldwide. It is widely relied upon for its writing style guide, the AP Stylebook. Whether other news organizations will follow the AP’s lead in rejecting AI-generated articles remains to be seen. However, the AP’s stance reaffirms its commitment to producing reliable, accurate, and human-driven news content in an era of rapidly advancing AI technology.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Related to the Above News

What is the AP's stance on the use of AI-generated news articles?

The AP is against the use of AI-generated news articles as a replacement for human journalists.

Are AP journalists allowed to experiment with AI chatbots?

Yes, AP journalists are allowed to experiment with AI chatbots like ChatGPT, but the AI-generated output cannot be published. It must be treated as unvetted source material that requires independent verification.

Why has the AP implemented these new guidelines?

The AP has implemented these guidelines to ensure the veracity of its news reporting. The organization wants journalists to prioritize source verification and independently validate information, given the potential inaccuracies of AI-generated content.

What steps are AP journalists expected to take under these new guidelines?

AP journalists are expected to be extra cautious about their sources, conducting reverse image searches, seeking corroboration from multiple trusted sources, and independently verifying the information provided by AI-generated content.

Have other media organizations joined the AP in advocating against AI-generated articles?

Yes, major media organizations, including the AP, have signed an open letter urging lawmakers to require AI developers to obtain consent before training their models on media content.

Does the AP use AI in any capacity?

Yes, the AP uses AI for certain tasks such as generating articles on niche data-driven topics or summarizing stories for subhead blurbs. However, it does not use AI to modify photos, videos, or audio.

What agreement does the AP have with OpenAI, the creator of ChatGPT?

The AP has entered into a two-year agreement with OpenAI, allowing the company to train its language models on the AP's extensive archive of content. In return, OpenAI has made philanthropic donations to journalism nonprofits.

How does the AP's approach differ from that of other newsrooms?

While the AP has taken a cautious approach to AI-generated articles, other newsrooms, like The New York Times, have updated their Terms of Service to prohibit the use of their articles for training AI models. However, some newsrooms, like Google, continue to pursue partnerships to promote the use of AI tools.

Have media outlets attempted fully AI-generated articles?

Yes, media outlets like CNET have experimented with fully AI-generated articles. However, these attempts have faced criticism for their inaccuracies.

Why is the AP's stance significant?

The AP's influence extends globally, with its content being republished by over 1,000 smaller news outlets worldwide. By rejecting AI-generated articles, the AP reaffirms its commitment to producing reliable, accurate, and human-driven news content in an era of advancing AI technology.

Please note that the FAQs provided on this page are based on the news article published. While we strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, it is always recommended to consult relevant authorities or professionals before making any decisions or taking action based on the FAQs or the news article.

Share post:

Subscribe

Popular

More like this
Related

Samsung’s Foldable Phones: The Future of Smartphone Screens

Discover how Samsung's Galaxy Z Fold 6 is leading the way with innovative software & dual-screen design for the future of smartphones.

Unlocking Franchise Success: Leveraging Cognitive Biases in Sales

Unlock franchise success by leveraging cognitive biases in sales. Use psychology to craft compelling narratives and drive successful deals.

Wiz Walks Away from $23B Google Deal, Pursues IPO Instead

Wiz Walks away from $23B Google Deal in favor of pursuing IPO. Investors gear up for trading with updates on market performance and key developments.

Southern Punjab Secretariat Leads Pakistan in AI Adoption, Prominent Figures Attend Demo

Experience how South Punjab Secretariat leads Pakistan in AI adoption with a demo attended by prominent figures. Learn about their groundbreaking initiative.