India’s Telecom Industry Faces Critical Skill Gap – 3.8x Increase by 2030

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India’s Telecom Industry Faces Critical Skill Gap – 3.8x Increase by 2030

India’s telecom industry is currently grappling with a significant skill gap that is expected to increase by 3.8 times by 2030, according to a report released by the Telecom Sector Skill Council (TSSC). The report highlights that the country already faces a demand-supply gap of 2.41 million skilled professionals in the telecom sector, which is projected to soar in the coming years.

One of the key issues contributing to this skill gap is the mismatch between the academic requirements and the industry demands. Shockingly, only 40 percent of India’s graduates in computer science, IT, and Mathematics are considered employable in the technology sector. This discrepancy puts a strain on the industry’s ability to find qualified talent.

The report titled Telecom Talent in 5G Era: Demand Supply Skill Gap Report 2023-24, produced in collaboration with Draup, sheds light on the current state of the telecom industry’s talent pool. Currently, there are 11.59 million employed professionals in the Indian telecom sector, comprising 2.95 million corporate talent and 8.24 million blue-collar talent. However, there is a pressing need for skilled workers in order to meet the demands of advancing technologies.

In fact, by 2025, the report predicts that India will require a staggering 22 million skilled workers in 5G-focused industries. These industries encompass areas such as cloud computing, robotics, and the Internet of Things (IoT). Still, there is hope for India, as it is the only country expected to have a surplus of skilled labor in the Technology, Media, and Telecommunications (TMT) sector by 2030, with an estimated 1.3 million workers.

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Recognizing the need to address this critical issue, Atul Tiwari, Secretary of the Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship, emphasized the importance of specialized skills and continuous upgradation in the telecom industry. The ministry is actively engaging with the industry to provide on-the-job training, internships, and apprenticeships that align with the latest industry standards. Additionally, efforts are being made to ensure skilling initiatives are in line with cutting-edge technologies, ultimately fostering a workforce ready for the future of telecom.

As technology continues to progress into the era of Web 3.0, the proportion of software in the telecom sector is expected to triple. The report suggests that powerful 6G network technologies, aided by artificial intelligence (AI) and the value of IoT and Robotic Process Automation (RPA), will emerge by 2023. This advancement has the potential to propel the telecom and tech industry to new heights.

Arvind Bali, CEO of the Telecom Sector Skill Council, emphasized the significance of the telecom sector in India, as it accounts for 6.5 percent of all foreign direct investment (FDI) inflow. By 2027, India is projected to account for 11 percent of all 5G subscriptions worldwide, solidifying its position in the industry. With the right reskilling and hiring strategies, targeting talent in Tier-II and III cities as well as universities, India can bridge the widening demand-supply gap by 2030.

In conclusion, India’s telecom industry faces a critical skill gap that is expected to significantly worsen over the next decade. Efforts to address this gap through specialized training programs and initiatives focusing on emerging technologies are essential to ensure a skilled workforce for the future. By leveraging the potential of 5G-focused industries, India has the opportunity to not only meet its own demand but also emerge as a global leader in the telecom and tech sector.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Related to the Above News

What is the current state of India's telecom industry in terms of the skill gap?

India's telecom industry is currently grappling with a significant skill gap, with a demand-supply gap of 2.41 million skilled professionals in the sector.

How much is the skill gap projected to increase by 2030?

The skill gap in India's telecom industry is expected to increase by 3.8 times by 2030.

What is one of the key factors contributing to this skill gap?

One of the key factors contributing to the skill gap is the mismatch between academic requirements and industry demands.

What percentage of India's graduates in computer science, IT, and Mathematics are considered employable in the technology sector?

Shockingly, only 40 percent of India's graduates in computer science, IT, and Mathematics are considered employable in the technology sector.

How many skilled workers does India require in 5G-focused industries by 2025?

By 2025, India will require a staggering 22 million skilled workers in 5G-focused industries.

What efforts are being made to address this critical skill gap?

The Ministry of Skill Development and Entrepreneurship is actively engaging with the industry to provide on-the-job training, internships, and apprenticeships aligned with the latest industry standards.

What technologies are expected to emerge by 2023 in the telecom sector?

Powerful 6G network technologies, aided by artificial intelligence (AI), Internet of Things (IoT), and Robotic Process Automation (RPA), are expected to emerge by 2023.

What is the projected proportion of software in the telecom sector in the future?

As technology progresses into the era of Web 3.0, the proportion of software in the telecom sector is expected to triple.

What percentage of all foreign direct investment (FDI) inflow does the telecom sector account for in India?

The telecom sector accounts for 6.5 percent of all foreign direct investment (FDI) inflow in India.

What is India's projected position in terms of 5G subscriptions worldwide?

By 2027, India is projected to account for 11 percent of all 5G subscriptions worldwide.

How can India bridge the skill gap by 2030?

By implementing specialized training programs, initiatives focusing on emerging technologies, and targeting talent in Tier-II and III cities as well as universities, India can bridge the widening demand-supply gap by 2030.

Please note that the FAQs provided on this page are based on the news article published. While we strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, it is always recommended to consult relevant authorities or professionals before making any decisions or taking action based on the FAQs or the news article.

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