Concerns Grow Over Lack of AI Regulation in Digital Personal Data Protection Bill

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Concerns are growing over the lack of AI regulation in the Digital Personal Data Protection (DPDP) Bill, particularly regarding the rising prevalence of deep fakes created by generative AI tools. Experts are urging the need for the DPDP to address this issue, especially with upcoming elections in India and the US, where manipulated images and videos could be used to tarnish the reputation of public figures. However, the current version of the DPDP Bill does not include any provisions governing artificial intelligence or emerging technologies like generative AI, causing alarm among experts who fear a gap in privacy laws.

The absence of regulations regarding facial recognition technology and AI in the DPDP Bill has raised concerns about the lack of clarity and ambiguity surrounding these rapidly evolving technologies. Mishi Choudhary, founder of the Software Freedom Law Centre, expressed disappointment that the law fails to address current and emerging issues created by generative AI. Similarly, the General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR), although designed to provide transparency and explainability, is also struggling to keep up with the challenges posed by AI, leading the EU to work on a separate regulatory framework.

With elections on the horizon, experts emphasize the urgency of mandating clear labeling for AI-generated content to prevent its potentially misleading influence on voters. Jaspreet Bindra, Founder and MD of Tech Whisperer, contends that the government should include this clause in the Digital Personal Data Protection Bill. Another concern is the ease with which objectionable content can be distributed through generative AI by smaller, harder-to-track developers compared to larger intermediaries and platforms.

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India’s AI market is projected to grow significantly, with estimates suggesting it could reach $7.8 billion from $3.1 billion between 2020 and 2025. The number of AI startups in India has also multiplied in recent years. Earlier this year, reports indicated that generative AI platforms such as ChatGPT and Google’s Bard might be prohibited from processing Indian citizens’ personal data available in the public domain, as the DPDP Bill restricts search engine companies and developers from scraping large amounts of publicly available internet data.

In response to the concerns surrounding AI regulation, the government intends to introduce provisions governing AI in the forthcoming Digital India (DI) Bill, which aims to modernize the 23-year-old IT Act of 2000. However, some experts warn that the DI Bill may take several years to become legislation, while others argue that including these provisions in the DPDP Bill would be more prudent.

While some experts believe that the DPDP Bill adequately covers AI and emerging technologies, others argue that the Digital India Act should encompass all emerging technologies since it seeks to replace the previous IT Act. As the IT landscape enters the Web 3.0 era, an overhaul of the IT Act is necessary, and the DPDP, focused on personal data protection, should be broad enough to encompass all technologies.

In conclusion, the absence of AI regulation in the DPDP Bill has raised concerns among experts, particularly regarding the proliferation of deep fakes created by generative AI tools. The need to address this issue becomes even more urgent with upcoming elections in India and the US. Experts emphasize the importance of clear labeling for AI-generated content and the challenges posed by the open source nature of generative AI. While the government plans to address AI regulation in the Digital India Bill, concerns remain about the time it may take for it to become legislation. As the AI market continues to grow in India, the inclusion of AI provisions becomes crucial for protecting privacy and addressing the evolving landscape of AI technology.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Related to the Above News

What are the concerns surrounding AI regulation in the Digital Personal Data Protection (DPDP) Bill?

The concerns primarily revolve around the lack of provisions governing artificial intelligence and emerging technologies like generative AI in the DPDP Bill. This absence raises concerns about the ambiguity and lack of clarity surrounding rapidly evolving technologies, particularly in relation to deep fakes created by generative AI tools.

Why is the absence of AI regulation in the DPDP Bill a matter of concern?

The absence of AI regulation in the DPDP Bill is concerning because it fails to address current and emerging issues related to artificial intelligence. With upcoming elections in India and the US, there is a fear that manipulated images and videos created using generative AI tools could be used to tarnish the reputation of public figures. The lack of regulations also leads to a gap in privacy laws, creating potential risks for individuals' personal data.

What is the government's response to the concerns surrounding AI regulation in the DPDP Bill?

The government intends to introduce provisions governing AI in the forthcoming Digital India (DI) Bill. The DI Bill seeks to modernize the 23-year-old IT Act of 2000. However, there are concerns that the DI Bill may take several years to become legislation, leading some experts to argue for including AI provisions in the DPDP Bill instead.

What measures do experts suggest to address the concerns regarding AI-generated content?

Experts emphasize the urgency of mandating clear labeling for AI-generated content to prevent its potentially misleading influence on voters, especially with upcoming elections. They argue that the government should include this clause in the DPDP Bill or the forthcoming DI Bill. Additionally, there are concerns about the ease of distribution of objectionable content through generative AI, particularly by smaller developers who may be harder to track compared to larger intermediaries and platforms.

How does the absence of AI regulation affect the growing AI market in India?

The absence of AI regulation in the DPDP Bill raises concerns for the growing AI market in India. Without clear regulations, there may be ambiguity and uncertainty surrounding the use of AI technologies, potentially hindering the market's growth and development. It is essential to provide a regulatory framework that ensures privacy protection and addresses the evolving landscape of AI technology.

What is the government's plan to address AI regulation?

The government plans to introduce provisions governing AI in the forthcoming Digital India Bill. This bill aims to modernize the 23-year-old IT Act of 2000. However, there are concerns that the passage of the DI Bill may take several years, while some experts argue that the AI provisions should be included in the DPDP Bill to address the urgency of the matter.

Please note that the FAQs provided on this page are based on the news article published. While we strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, it is always recommended to consult relevant authorities or professionals before making any decisions or taking action based on the FAQs or the news article.

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