Scientists Unveil Breakthroughs in Simulations, AI, and Software at SC23 Conference

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Scientists from the prestigious Argonne National Laboratory are preparing to showcase their latest breakthroughs in simulations, algorithm development, artificial intelligence (AI), and software at the upcoming SC23 conference. This conference, known as the International Conference for High-Performance Computing, Networking, Storage, and Analysis, will take place in Denver from November 12 to 16.

At the conference, scientists from Argonne will present their pioneering approach called Nexus, which connects experimental, computing, and storage facilities at the laboratory and beyond. Nexus aims to create a cohesive scientific infrastructure, revolutionizing the way research is conducted.

Rachana Ananthakrishnan and Tom Uram, part of the Argonne team, will deliver a featured talk on Nexus at the DOE’s exhibit booth. Their presentation will highlight the innovative features of this approach and how it benefits the scientific community.

One of the main attractions at the conference will be the Aurora exascale supercomputer, which will be showcased at the Intel exhibit booth. Argonne researchers will demonstrate how this supercomputer has had a significant impact on developer communities and its readiness for exascale applications. They will also showcase early scientific work that utilizes in-situ visualization, providing a glimpse into the potential advancements made possible by this revolutionary technology.

Valerie Taylor, a Distinguished Fellow and director of Argonne’s Mathematics and Computer Science division, will play a crucial role in the SC23 opening plenary. As the moderator of the plenary, titled I Am HPC: Impact and Future Directions, Taylor will lead a discussion on the social impact of high-performance computing (HPC) in terms of scientific and technical achievements. Her research expertise in performance analysis and modeling of parallel scientific applications makes her a perfect fit for this role.

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Two teams of researchers from Argonne have also been named as finalists for the prestigious Gordon Bell Prize. The first team, consisting of members from Argonne, DOE’s Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Penn State University, and the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, has been recognized for their groundbreaking work on Exascale Multiphysics Nuclear Reactor Simulations for Advanced Designs. This work marks the first-ever simulation of a fully coupled, fully resolved nuclear reactor core. The second team, led by DOE’s Sandia National Laboratory, with contributions from Argonne researchers, has been nominated for the Gordon Bell Prize for Climate Modeling. Their work involves running a high-resolution global atmosphere model on the Frontier exascale supercomputer, providing a more accurate understanding of cloud processes and their impact on climate change and weather patterns.

In addition, Rick Stevens, associate laboratory director of Computing, Environment, and Life Sciences at Argonne, will participate in a panel discussion at the conference. The discussion will focus on the practical applications of superconducting digital computing (SDC) in future systems. Stevens and his fellow panelists will explore the necessary research and development required to fully realize the potential of SDC.

The Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) will also have a presence at the conference. Murali Emani, a member of ALCF, will lead a workshop on the use of AI/machine learning (ML) in scientific applications. This annual workshop aims to share advances in AI/ML, introduce new scientific application problems, and stimulate the development of tools and infrastructures.

These activities represent just a selection of the contributions Argonne researchers will be making at the SC23 conference. Their presence and groundbreaking work in the fields of high-performance computing, AI, simulations, and software development reaffirm Argonne National Laboratory’s commitment to pushing the boundaries of scientific innovation.

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Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Related to the Above News

What is the SC23 conference?

The SC23 conference stands for the International Conference for High-Performance Computing, Networking, Storage, and Analysis. It is a prestigious event where scientists and researchers gather to showcase breakthroughs and advancements in various fields related to computing and data analysis.

What is Nexus and how does it revolutionize research?

Nexus is a pioneering approach developed by scientists from the Argonne National Laboratory. It aims to create a cohesive scientific infrastructure by connecting experimental, computing, and storage facilities at the laboratory and beyond. This approach revolutionizes research by streamlining the process and enabling seamless collaboration, ultimately enhancing the efficiency and effectiveness of scientific endeavors.

What will the featured talk on Nexus at the DOE's exhibit booth cover?

The featured talk on Nexus at the DOE's exhibit booth will be delivered by Rachana Ananthakrishnan and Tom Uram, part of the Argonne team. They will highlight the innovative features of Nexus and explain how it benefits the scientific community, providing insights into this groundbreaking approach.

What will be showcased at the Intel exhibit booth during the conference?

The Intel exhibit booth will showcase the Aurora exascale supercomputer. Argonne researchers will demonstrate how this supercomputer has made a significant impact on developer communities and its readiness for exascale applications. They will also showcase early scientific work utilizing in-situ visualization, giving attendees a glimpse into the potential advancements made possible by this revolutionary technology.

What role will Valerie Taylor play in the SC23 opening plenary?

Valerie Taylor, a Distinguished Fellow and director of Argonne's Mathematics and Computer Science division, will moderate the SC23 opening plenary. The plenary, titled I Am HPC: Impact and Future Directions, will discuss the social impact of high-performance computing (HPC) in terms of scientific and technical achievements. With her expertise in performance analysis and modeling of parallel scientific applications, Taylor is well-suited for leading this discussion.

What groundbreaking work has earned two teams of researchers from Argonne recognition at the conference?

Two teams of researchers from Argonne have been named as finalists for the prestigious Gordon Bell Prize. The first team has been recognized for their groundbreaking work on Exascale Multiphysics Nuclear Reactor Simulations for Advanced Designs, which involved simulating a fully coupled and fully resolved nuclear reactor core for the first time. The second team has been nominated for the Gordon Bell Prize for Climate Modeling, running a high-resolution global atmosphere model on the Frontier exascale supercomputer to gain a better understanding of cloud processes and their impact on climate change and weather patterns.

Who will participate in the panel discussion on superconducting digital computing (SDC)?

Rick Stevens, associate laboratory director of Computing, Environment, and Life Sciences at Argonne, will participate in the panel discussion on superconducting digital computing (SDC) at the conference. Stevens and his fellow panelists will explore the practical applications of SDC in future systems and discuss the necessary research and development required to fully realize its potential.

What workshop will the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF) lead at the conference?

Murali Emani, a member of the Argonne Leadership Computing Facility (ALCF), will lead a workshop on the use of AI/machine learning (ML) in scientific applications. This annual workshop aims to share advances in AI/ML, introduce new scientific application problems, and stimulate the development of tools and infrastructures.

How does Argonne National Laboratory demonstrate its commitment to scientific innovation?

Argonne National Laboratory demonstrates its commitment to scientific innovation through the presence and groundbreaking work of its researchers at the SC23 conference. Their contributions in the fields of high-performance computing, AI, simulations, and software development push the boundaries of scientific innovation and reaffirm Argonne's dedication to advancing knowledge and technology.

Please note that the FAQs provided on this page are based on the news article published. While we strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, it is always recommended to consult relevant authorities or professionals before making any decisions or taking action based on the FAQs or the news article.

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