Neuroscientists Train Artificial Intelligence to Predict Drug Responses with over 80% Accuracy

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Neuroscientists have trained artificial intelligence (AI) to predict drug responses with over 80% accuracy, offering hope for targeted and personalized medicine. Led by neuroscientist Kirill Martemyanov at The Herbert Wertheim UF Scripps Institute for Biomedical Innovation & Technology in Florida, an international team used a molecular tracking technology to profile the action of more than 100 prominent cellular drug targets. They then developed and trained an AI-anchored platform using this data, which accurately predicted how cell surface receptors would respond to drug-like molecules in 80% of cases.

The team’s long-term goal is to refine the AI tool to help design precision medications. Currently, many medicines have a one-size-fits-all approach, but individuals have tremendous variability in their cell receptors. By knowing the exact genetic alteration a person has, doctors could prescribe drugs tailored to their specific needs, improving effectiveness and reducing the risk of harmful side effects.

One-third of all drugs work by binding to cell-surface receptors called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are involved in a range of biological activities. These receptors are complex structures that cross the cell membrane, with a docking station on the cell’s exterior and a branch that extends into the cell. When a drug binds to a GPCR, it triggers a cascade of changes inside the cell.

The team’s research focused on cataloging the activity of GPCRs and their genetic variations. They used a technology called bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to observe and document the signaling in a comprehensive way. By gathering data on the activation rate, amplitude, and selectivity of GPCRs, as well as incorporating genetic variants, the team was able to train the AI to make predictions based on this nuanced information.

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The potential impact of this research is significant. By gaining a deeper understanding of GPCRs and their activities, and by incorporating genetic variation data, drug developers could create safer medicines more efficiently and at a lower cost. The researchers’ ultimate goal is to predict how individual genetic variants respond to drugs, enabling the custom tailoring of prescriptions and paving the way for precision medicine.

The team’s study, published in the journal Cell Reports, has attracted attention in the scientific community and is likely to inspire further research into the role of GPCRs in drug response. By leveraging AI and molecular tracking technology, researchers are making strides towards a future where medicine can be personalized and optimized for individual patients’ needs.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQs) Related to the Above News

What is the main focus of the research conducted by neuroscientists at The Herbert Wertheim UF Scripps Institute for Biomedical Innovation & Technology?

The main focus of the research was to train artificial intelligence (AI) to accurately predict drug responses, specifically targeting cell surface receptors called G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs).

How was the AI-anchored platform developed and trained?

The AI-anchored platform was developed and trained using molecular tracking technology that profiled the action of over 100 cellular drug targets. The data collected on the activation rate, amplitude, selectivity, and genetic variants of GPCRs was used to train the AI to make accurate predictions.

What is the potential impact of this research?

This research has the potential to revolutionize the field of medicine by enabling the development of safer, more efficient, and personalized medications. By understanding the activities of GPCRs and incorporating genetic variation data, drug developers can create tailored prescriptions, improving effectiveness, and minimizing harmful side effects.

How can personalized medicine be achieved through this research?

Personalized medicine can be achieved by predicting how individual genetic variants respond to drugs. By understanding an individual's specific genetic alteration, doctors can prescribe drugs that are tailored to their specific needs, optimizing treatment outcomes and reducing risks of side effects.

What role do GPCRs play in drug response?

GPCRs are cell surface receptors that participate in a variety of biological activities. One-third of all drugs work by binding to GPCRs. When a drug binds to a GPCR, it triggers changes inside the cell, leading to various physiological effects.

How did the researchers gather data on GPCR activity and genetic variation?

The researchers used a technology called bioluminescence resonance energy transfer to observe and document the signaling of GPCRs in a comprehensive way. This allowed them to gather data on the activation rate, amplitude, and selectivity of GPCRs, as well as incorporate information about genetic variants.

What is the long-term goal of the research team?

The long-term goal of the research team is to refine the AI tool and use it to design precision medications. They aim to move away from the one-size-fits-all approach in medicine and develop drugs that are tailored to an individual's specific genetic makeup, improving effectiveness and safety.

Where was the research study published?

The research study was published in the journal Cell Reports.

How has the research been received in the scientific community?

The research study has attracted attention in the scientific community and is likely to inspire further research into the role of GPCRs in drug response. The use of AI and molecular tracking technology in this study has shown promising progress towards personalized and optimized medicine.

Please note that the FAQs provided on this page are based on the news article published. While we strive to provide accurate and up-to-date information, it is always recommended to consult relevant authorities or professionals before making any decisions or taking action based on the FAQs or the news article.

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